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Letters to the Editor

To the Editor:
Parents play a major role in their children’s choices about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. In a recent national survey of parents and teens by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia  University, one-third of teen partygoers have been to parties where teens were drinking, smoking pot or using cocaine, Ecstacy or prescription drugs while a parent was present. By age 17, nearly half (46 percent) of teens have been at such parties where parents were present.

Drug-Free Action Alliance and Personal and Family Counseling Services are working together to bring the “Parents Who Host, Lose the Most: Don’t be  a party to teenage drinking” public awareness campaign to the communities of Tuscarawas and Carroll counties to provide parents good information about the health risks and the legal consequences of providing alcohol to youth. The campaign encourages parents and the community to send a unified message at prom and graduation time that teen alcohol consumption is not acceptable.

Hosting a prom or graduation party where alcohol is available to underage youth is illegal and can pose serious health risks and legal ramifications for everyone involved. Parents should understand that taking away the car keys does not solve all of the problems related to underage drinking. Every day, at lease six youth under age 21 die from non-driving alcohol-related causes such as drowning and suicide. Sexual activity and delinquent behaviors also increase with underage drinking. Parents who knowingly allow a person under age 21 to remain on their property while consuming or possessing alcoholic beverages can be prosecuted and face a jail sentence, fines and/or loss of property.

Adults providing alcohol to underage youth send a mixed message and can only add to a teenager’s confusion about the acceptability of drinking. They are also sending the message to teens that they do not have to obey the law. Research shows most teens appreciate it when their parents set boundaries and establish expectations that are fairly enforced. Our youth deserve to live to grow into adulthood in an environment where alcohol is not misused. Let’s be unified in our message and host alcohol-free parties with plenty of fun activities to show our youth we care about their future.

Frances Gerbig
Coordinator
Takin’ It To the Streets
Personal and Family Counseling Services


To the Editor:
I would like to thank the talented Carrollton High School Concert Band students for their hard work and dedication this year. Not only did they give a superior performance at District contest, but they did an amazing job at state as well. I am extremely proud of them. I would also like to thank the Taylor family for their great support and kind words. I would also like to thank all the parents who came to support the band at State Contest. A special thanks to Tom Mesler and the Carrollton Fire Department for their time on Friday night.

Mr. Dave Dickerhoof
Head Band Director


To the Editor:
The CHS Concert Band had a chance to go to state competition April 30. As parents of one of those students, we would like to say how very proud we are of our daughter and the entire band.

What a great opportunity it was for the kids to get to go to state. Now they are talking positive about “how they are going to go again next year,” not “if we go again next year.”

We also want to express our sincerity on how great it was to see all those parents, grandparents and siblings of those band kids on the Square when the fire truck led the buses around the Square. The kids were surprised and it was great to see everyone there clapping and cheering on those kids!

Thank you to Mr. Dave Dickerhoof (band director) and Mrs. Heather Shive (assistant band director). Without your guidance, they would not have gotten this far.

Don and Jen Minor
Carrollton, OH


Dear Editor:
Students from Carrollton High School have just finished coming into our classroom to teach us about the harmful and addictive effects of tobacco and nicotine-containing products, especially smokeless tobacco.

These high school students are members of Stay Tobacco-Free Athlete Mentor Program (STAMP) sponsored by the American Cancer Society. We have learned that most teens don’t smoke and that tobacco companies try very hard to convince us that smoking is safe.

Learning these warnings from students that I look up to had an impact on me. I think it’s sad that people use cigarettes, chewing tobacco and snuff just to try to be cool. Using these substances can cause cancer that could make you lose part of your face, not to mention other cancers.

People who smoke, especially parents, should think about what they are doing to the people they smoke around. Did you know that if a non-smoker is in a car with someone smoking it’s like the non-smoker has smoked 4 cigarettes just by breathing the second-hand smoke?

Use of tobacco products is also very costly. If you smoke one pack a day it could cost almost $2,000 a year! I think people should save the money and their heath and go on a nice vacation!

Just think of all the nice things you could do with $2,000 every year! You should consider making it a resolution in 2010 to stop smoking tobacco or help someone you know to quit. Thank you STAMP mentors, Jasmine, Ben and Garth.

Maggie Mapes
(Student in Mrs. Shroyer’s 7th grade class
 at Bell-Herron Middle School)


Dear Editor:
Students from Carrollton High School have just finished coming into our classroom to teach us about the harmful and addictive effects of tobacco and nicotine - containing products, especially smokeless tobacco.

These high school students are mentors from Stay Tobacco-Free Athlete Mentor Program (STAMP) sponsored by the American Cancer Society. We have learned that most teens do not smoke and tobacco companies try very hard to convince us that smoking is safe.

Any kind of tobacco can harm you, smokeless or not. When you read this you will probably think, “whatever I’ve heard this talk like a thousand times,” so I’m going to do my best to try to persuade you to quit or never pick up any tobacco products.

You could pay for two semesters of a child’s college in the amount of time you could buy a pack of cigarettes every day for five years. If you think about it that’s a lot of money.

In one can of chew, there is 60 cigarettes worth of nicotine, so don’t think chew is any better for you than cigarettes. Any tobacco products are liable to cause cancer. Think about your family on this one. How would they feel if you were diagnosed with cancer?

I may not be the smartest, but I know that tobacco is bad for you and is hard to get off when you’re hooked. Think about it, quitting or never getting hooked just might save your life.

Hunter Johnston
(Student in Mrs. Shroyer’s 7th grade class
at Bell-Herron Middle School)


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