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Letters to the Editor

To the Editor:
Lest we forget.
George Washington, having won the war, was elected our first President. He was urged by some to use the army and make himself king. He said when his term was over, he would return to his army. King George III said, “If he does that, he will be the greatest man in the world.” He did and he was.

As President, George Washington did not bow to kings. He never criticized his own country and I believe none of our presidents should. They should never argue the case against the United States, but for it. Countries, people or religions that harbor, shelter, support, encourage or cheer attacks upon our country or the slaughter of our friends and family are enemies to the United States. You do not apologize to them.

When we send our American soldiers to face these enemies, our country must support them as a country, starting with our president on down. The American soldier is as precious as the closest of your kin because he is your kin and for his sake, the president must, in effect, say to the Congress and the people, “I am the Commander in Chief. It is my sacred duty to defend the United States and to give our soldiers what they need to complete the mission and come home safe, whatever the cost.”

This would be adhering to the highest principles and ideals of his office. The reason is written on the blood-soaked ground of Saratoga, Yorktown, Antietam, the Marne, Guada Canal, the Chosen Reservoir, Khe Sanh, Iraq, Twin Towers, Afghanistan and many other places in our history.

Many who fought to defend freedom in these places are silent now and forever, but from the silence of every patriot’s grave there is yet an echo that says, “It is not too late; keep faith with us, keep faith in God and do not lose hope of our republic.”

We must remember: It was the veteran, not the preacher, who fought for freedom of religion. It was the veteran, not the reporter, who fought for freedom of the press. It was the veteran, not the campus organizer, who fought for freedom to assemble. It was the veteran, not the lawyer, who fought to give us the right to a fair trial. It was the veteran, not the politician, who fought to give us the right to vote. They are who made our republic strong. They should not be forgotten. Keep them in your prayers.

Charles R. Pearson
Chaplain
Malvern Legion Post 375     

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